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20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 23
KQEH (PBS) 12
KRCB (PBS) 11
WETA 5
WMPT (PBS) 3
WJZ (CBS) 1
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English 55
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
,655. for the year, gold is up about 5%, half the gain in the s&p 500. but as erika miller reports, some gold bugs believe next year will be far better for the precious metal. >> reporter: if you got gold jewelry as a holiday gift, it may be more than something beautiful to wear. it may also prove to be a shining investment. some gold traders think the yellow metal could hit $2,000 an ounce next year. the reason? >> monetary easing. all these governments have debt and there's only one way to pay it back and it's to devalue their own currency. and it's a race to the bottom. >> reporter: there are other factors that could also help support gold prices. central banks worldwide have been boosting their gold holdings to diversify their portfolios, and protect against inflation. this year, central banks bought roughly 500 metric tons of gold, up 8% from last year. in addition, many small investors are buying gold as a safehaven from global instability. >> political certainty is a major driving factor. it is not just here. but, in the western europe, and in the far east. and, in china. >> reporter: stron
, if the economy picks up sharply, riskier assets could become more attractive. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: more signs today that housing demand is picking up: the number of contracts signed to buy homes rose in november, to its best level in more tan two years. the national association of realtors index of pending sales rose almost 10% last month. so will the housing market continue to recover in the new year? that's what tom hudson asked toll brothers chief financial officer marty connor. >> the housing market willcontig as done consumer confidence maintains or improfls. and a lot of that will be contingent on resolution of the fiscal cliff and the government and the economy. >> a lot of ways to measure thet but the most direct way for momentum home buyers and sellers is prices. do you expect that trajectory to continue? >> i do.we have raised prices ia little more than half of our communities. it's been relatively modest. but as we observe and we read stats, we are getting a lit lite more confident and may push prices a bit more in 2013. >> what are you finding in termg materi
, up almost 16%, and the s&p closed the year with a 13% gain. erika miller takes a closer look at the forces driving stocks this year. >> reporter: many investors are asking themselves why the stock market did so well this year, when the economy was so weak? the answer is the fed. >> you have to give them a good deal of the credit. they have had quantitative easing again and again. bernanke has said he does not want us to sleep into that kind of economic coma that seemed to take over japan. >> reporter: and that support from the fed was enough to overcome worries about a weakening global economy, and a debt crisis in europe. but many small investors have missed out on the market's gains this year. on the whole, they've taken money out of stocks, and put it into bonds. >> small investors have become dubious of equities because essentially from 1999 until the beginning of this year, there was no return on equities. they feel they're at a disadvantage to institutional investors and computerized trading. the economy has been lackluster. >> reporter: some of the most aggressive stoc
.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem, one that we want to make a dent in. >> reporter: lowering the number of infections is also good for the hospital's financial health. >> it increases length of stay. it doubles the cost of many operations. we're not reimbursed the same way that we used to for hospital-acquired infections. >> reporter: so the hospital tried an experiment. it put cameras at the entrance to patient rooms in its intensive care unit and tallied how many times workers followed hand hygiene procedures. the compliance rate w less than 10%. but once the hospital started posting the results for the shift publicly, the rate skyrocketed to over 90%. and there were other benefits:
. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. coming up tonight, we'll talk to the c.e.o. of kitchen store sur la table and get his outlook for holiday sales. >> tom: lots of theatrics today, but few visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will hit its borrowing limit early next year, darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: sitting around the kitchen table with a middle class family in virginia, the president once again pressed for congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> if this family has a couple of thousand dollars less to spend, that translates into $200 billion of less consumer spending next year. and that's bad for businesses, large and small. >> reporter: behind the scenes, the two sides are talking again. but there was no progress in public. senators today fought over the debt limit, and ended up deadlocked over a bill to allow the president to automaticall
. and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%, the lowest level since december of 2008. as erika miller reports, that wasn't the only surprise in today's report. >> reporter: almost no one on wall street saw this good news coming. there was every reason to think hiring would be weak last month. after all, many parts of the east coast are still recovering from devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was significant but was so short-lived that it didn't extend to the sample period of the employment report which was the week that covered november 12. >> reporter: hiring was also supposed to be weak due to worries about the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next yer, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the une
of the year for online retailers. erika miller reports. >> reporter: if you're wondering why today is called "green monday," its because of all the green changing hands. many of the sales are now online, so stores offer deep discounts to lure shoppers to their sites. the term "green monday" was created by ebay in 2007. it refers to the second monday in december, which is typically that site's biggest sales day of the year. overall, the season appears to be off to a strong start for merchants. >> i think they planned their inventory wisely. i think they planned their markdowns wisely. so, i think that smart retailers are saying, "we're going to go promote and were going to start early to get some of the momentum, and then we're going to keep going through the holiday." >> reporter: more than $1 billion was spent on last year's green monday, and this year is expected to be even better. but if you haven't even started your holiday shopping, relax. the deadline to send packages with standard shipping by christmas is next monday, december 17, and over 1,200 retailers will be offering free shippin
something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that doesn't necessarily mean the stock market will shout. at it's final meeting of the year, the central bank is not expected to simply tend its operati twist program. that's the nickname for the fed's strategy of buying long- term treasuries and, at the same time, selling an equal amount of shorter-dated bonds. that's important because it keeps the bank's balance sheet the same size. now, the fed may be ready to do a new stimulus dance. >> under twist, they've been purchasing $45 billion longer term treasuries while at the same time selling $45 billion short term. they've pretty much run out of short-term stuff to sell, so i think they'll be continuing to purchase the long term, but purchasing outright, expanding their balance sheet. >> reporter: and that would be on top of $40 billion a month already committed to buy mortgage-backed securities. some experts worry that $85 billion a month in spending will escalate inflation and, eventually, it cou
,000 temporary helpers to ease the load. so what does it take to be a u.p.s. driver? erika miller spent a morning finding out. >> reporter: if you want to know santa's true helpers, they're people like tony roshdy. i met up with him recently at 9 a.m., both of us dressed in brown polyester. >> you ready to do some work? >> reporter: i am ready! by then, most of the packages had already been loaded on the truck: is there a strategy to loading up the truck? >> there's definitely a strategy. like every building. let me give you an example. i already know that this is 31 west 27th. i don't even have to look at it. i'm going to go over here, it's gonna say 31 west 27th. >> reporter: typically at this time of year, how many packages are in your truck? >> i'm averaging somewhere between 300 an 380, on a regular basis. but that's only the delivery portion. >> reporter: but, suprisingly, there's no special treatment for fragile items: >> you can't sit there and say this is fragile, i'm going to treat it different. because that means you're treating your other boxes unprofessional. you have to tr
season: up more than 7%. it's also the top retail category of the year. and as erika miller reports, it's not just women lining up at the cosmetics counter these days. >> reporter: like a growing number of men, zach bruno is paying more attenion to the skin and grooming products he buys. >> i came from being younger, out of school, not really caring about that sort of thing, and as i became more of an adult, with a real job and my own apartment, i felt like okay, i need to take care of myself little better, inside and outside. >> reporter: so, he recently bought a subscription to a service called birchbox. once a month, he receives a box of samples of grooming and lifestyle products tailored to his needs. >> i've only gotten two boxes so far, and they range from skincare, haircare, i got a tie, which i thought was pretty cool. and the one kind of tie i don't have. >> reporter: if he likes the selections, he can buy more at the birchbox website. most of birchbox customers are still women, but katia beauchamp says sales of men's products are growing more quickly. >> but if you are able to
board? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york stock exchange has been the symbol of capitalism for nearly two centuries, but now it wants to give up its independence and be bought by a little-known rival in atlanta. the intercontinental exchange, or "ice" for short, was started 12 years ago as an energy trading platform. since then, the exchange has evolved into an internet-based marketplace trading futures, options, and derivatives. the reason it wants to buy the n.y.s.e. is not the plain vanilla stock trading business. the jewel in the deal is a division called "liffe," a leading futures and options exchange. it's based in london and drives over 40% of n.y.s.e. profits. >> it has a business that deals, for instance, in financial derivatives. these are derivatives contracts tied to financial products like interest rates, and ice has been wanting to expand in that direction for a while. >> reporter: as for the n.y.s.e., it's no secret that this year has been a tough one for the stock trading business. in addition, fewer companies are going public, so the i.p.o. market has dried
shopping. as erika miller reports, retailers hope they'll turn a ho-hum christmas into a merry one. >> reporter: the success of the holiday season for retailers depends on procrastinators, and also on families like the greers picking up a few extra gifts before the big day. >> we are looking for stationery, for frames. >> reporter: and that also means more gift wrap. >> we want gifts that you wonder if you really want to open them. that's what we want, those that catch your eye-- the beautiful bows, the wired ribbon. it's all so much a part of it. >> reporter: statistically, men are far more likely to leave their holiday shopping till last-minute. >> we do notice a lot of men coming into the store. i would say the difference between the men and the women-- the men come in, and they want us to take the lead and show us how it's done. >> reporter: not surprisingly, most stores are pulling out all the stops today to lure shoppers, offering deep discounts. >> the weather hasn't gotten cold in the majority of the country, through the midwest and the northeast. so cold weather categories
their gifts using smartphones and tablets. erika miller takes a closer at how mobile technology is transforming retail. >> reporter: holiday shopping used to mean walking from store to store, and waiting on long lines. but nowadays, many people are only to happy to let their fingers do the work. >> i think mobile technology and mobile commerce is really becoming the standout stars of this holiday season. >> reporter: most adults used at least one online retail site for their holiday shopping. less than half of adults bothered to shop in a bricks and mortar store. >> one-third of ebay's shoppers now use smartphones and tablets to buy or research items. wal-mart expects mobile to account for 40% of online holiday traffic this year. which is why that retailer and others have started offering special promotions exclusively for mobile shoppers. the growing popularity of mobile shopping is bad news for many bricks and mortar stores selling goods that are available online for less. nearly half all adults admit to showrooming. that's the industry term for going to a store to check out a
, if the economy picks up sharply riskier assets could become more attractive. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: more signs today that housing demand is picking up: the number of contracts signed to buy homes rose in november to its best level in more than two years. the national association of realtors index of pending sales rose almost 10% last month. so will the housing market continue to recover in the new year? that's what tom hudson asked toll brothers chief financial officer marty connor. >> the housing market willcontinue to strength enas long as done consumer confidence maintains or improfls. and a lot of that will be contingent on resolution of the fiscal cliff and the government and the economy. >> a lot of ways to measure thestrengthening enhousing market but the most direct way for momentum home buyers and sellers is prices. do you expect that trajectory to continue? >> i do.we have raised prices in a little more than half of our communities. it's been relatively modest. but as we observe and we read stats, we are getting a lit little more confident and may push prices a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)